Be the Bee is sponsored by the Archdiocese Department of Youth and Young Adult Ministries.

“At Y²AM, we believe the Gospel is just as powerful and relevant today as it was when the Apostles first began to preach the Good News that Christ gave them. This message of truth, healing, life, and salvation quickly spread from a tiny handful of disciples to every corner of the world. It is the same Gospel we preach today

At Y²AM, the Department of Youth and Young Adult Ministries of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, our goal is easy to state: to make God's love visible to the world. This is the essence of ministry, to make Christ manifest in our lives and to share Him with a world that, at times, has trouble finding Him. In other words, our goal is to (1) introduce people, particularly youth and young adults, to our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, and (2) invite them to truly live Orthodoxy.

Our weekly “Be the Bee” video series is a part of that: we hope to share the complex beauty of the Faith in a way that is clear and accessible to youth and young adults. Our Bee-treats take these ministry efforts to a whole new level.”

You can connect with “Be the Bee” at the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese's

Department of Youth & Young Adult Ministries!

youth.goarch.org

bethebee.goarch.org

Facebook: facebook.com/GOAYouth

Instagram: @GOA_Youth

Twitter: @GOA_Youth

Y2AM Gear at Orthodox Marketplace:

bethebee.goarch.org/merch

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Message from Fr Gary

Fr Gary

Hurricane Harvey


With all the tragic events happening in our world today: hurricanes earthquakes and shootings, it is comforting to know that our Orthodox Christian Church plays an active role in the recovery efforts. As a frontliner for the IOCC (International Orthodox Christian Charities) I can be deployed for any number of catastrophes to offer emotional and spiritual care (ESC). Following our deployment we are to submit a report to identify some of the work we encountered. The following is part of my incident report. The names have been changed to protect identities.

Some of the most touching visits I had with those that had lost everything were:

● Wheelchair bound woman, approximately 55 years old. Lives in 9 story building across the street. As soon as she realized that the Brown Convention Center was opened to those displaced she came over to lend a hand. Working off very little sleep. Was very emotional and shared many, many stories and encounters. The most telling was:

She took guardianship of a (total) stranger’s children (3 kids ages 7 and younger), while this stranger went into labor to deliver her fourth child.

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