Be the Bee is sponsored by the Archdiocese Department of Youth and Young Adult Ministries.

“At Y²AM, we believe the Gospel is just as powerful and relevant today as it was when the Apostles first began to preach the Good News that Christ gave them. This message of truth, healing, life, and salvation quickly spread from a tiny handful of disciples to every corner of the world. It is the same Gospel we preach today

At Y²AM, the Department of Youth and Young Adult Ministries of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, our goal is easy to state: to make God's love visible to the world. This is the essence of ministry, to make Christ manifest in our lives and to share Him with a world that, at times, has trouble finding Him. In other words, our goal is to (1) introduce people, particularly youth and young adults, to our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, and (2) invite them to truly live Orthodoxy.

Our weekly “Be the Bee” video series is a part of that: we hope to share the complex beauty of the Faith in a way that is clear and accessible to youth and young adults. Our Bee-treats take these ministry efforts to a whole new level.”

You can connect with “Be the Bee” at the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese's

Department of Youth & Young Adult Ministries!

youth.goarch.org

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Twitter: @GOA_Youth

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There is a certain standard of behavior that needs to be followed while inside a Greek Orthodox Church. Even if you’ve been attending the church for some time, it’s easy to forget some of these basic rules of etiquette. Here’s an overview of some of the things you need to remember while attending an Orthodox Church service.

  • Get There on Time

    It’s important to get to church on time. Even though plenty of people are late for church, this is usually something that bothers the priest, even if he doesn’t say anything. If you are late for the service, just be sure to follow the right protocol for entering the church so that your entrance doesn’t cause a disruption.
  • Before You Enter the Church

    When you arrive at church, the first thing you will do is walk through the doors and address anyone who greets you. Some churches may have official greeters standing at the door. After you walk in, it’s customary to take a candle and place a donation in the tray next to them. Then, you’ll light your candle, do your cross, and venerate any icons that are nearby.
  • Venerating the Icons

    After lighting the candle, you’ll then venerate any icons that are set up nearby. The candles in the Narthex commonly set up these icons. The proper way to kiss the icon is to make the sign of the cross three times and then kiss the hands. It is improper to kiss the icon on the face. If you’re wearing lipstick, be sure to wipe it off before you venerate the icon so that you don’t get it on the image.
  • Entering the Church

    Once the Divine Liturgy has begun, there are rules for the correct way to enter the church. Don’t enter the church if the epistle or gospel readings are taking place. It is also impolite to enter while the priest is giving a sermon or when the congregation is reciting the creed. Finally, you definitely shouldn’t enter while the consecration prayers are being said. If you do arrive while any of these are taking place, you should wait until he’s done before you take your seat.
  • What to Wear

    In recent years, Greek Orthodox Churches have gotten a little more casual than they used to be. The general rule is to wear clothes that are classy and not too provocative. Business casual or a suit and tie for the men are both acceptable. For women, wearing a dress or skirt that falls around the knee is preferred. Even though pantsuits are acceptable, they are still frowned on. When in doubt, dress in your best clothes. Also, be aware that men should remove their hats while in church.
  • Don’t Cross Your Legs

    Did you know that it is considered improper to cross your legs in an Orthodox Church? This is one of those rules that a lot of people don’t seem to adhere to. In the eyes of the church, this represents a form of arrogance that stands in the way of our relationship to God. Since a lot of people aren’t aware of this thinking, people tend to cross their legs without realizing that it is considered improper.

By following some of these basic rules of etiquette, you’ll get more out of the experience at church. Most of these rules are in place to help create an optimal place of worship.

Message from Fr Gary

Fr Gary

Encounter Christ


Many Evangelical Christians can name the date in which they were “Born Again.” The day in which they made Christ a priority in their life. Many of us, as Orthodox Christians, make that commitment on the day of our Baptism and Christmation, as infants. Are we transformed by the love of Christ? Do we allow ourselves to be transformed by Christ? There is a common theme in the Sunday Gospel readings following Pascha (Easter). Each of these five Sunday Gospels after Pascha distinguish a person (or persons) transformed by Christ.

The Sunday following Pascha we hear of “Doubting” Thomas. Thomas is skeptical about the encounter his brother disciples have with the risen Lord and make a bold proclamation, “Unless I see and touch!” The Lord reveals himself to Thomas and Thomas is immediately transformed. Without having to touch, he exclaims, “My Lord and my God!” Thomas encounter’s Christ and his faith is renewed.

The second Sunday after Pascha, we learn of the Myrrh-Bearing Women. These brave women approach the tomb of Christ and find it empty. Having encountered Christ, they return and share the good news with the disciples. Then on the third Sunday after our Lord’s Resurrection the Church shares the story of the paralytic. Although this happens before the Lord’s crucifixion, it holds fast to the theme of “Encountering Christ.” The man has suffered with an infirmity for 38 years...

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