1.) To share the Truth of Orthodoxy, bringing others towards Christ- we are biblically directed to share the Good News which encourages us to mature in our own faith.

    ·      "Come and See" to our extended community
    ·      Sharing the fullness of Orthodox Christianity.

 

2.) Increase Liturgical participation and encourage Personal relationships with Christ by increasing Sacramental awareness.  This is accomplished through each of constantly assessing where we stand in relationship to our God.  Realizing the growth needed in each of us, clergy and laity, we should commit ourselves to regular participation in the weekly cycle of services, i.e. Orthros and the Divine Liturgy on Sunday's as well as on respective Feasts of the Church and those services unique to seasons of our Liturgical year.  Furthermore, as individuals and as families, we should find time for increased prayer in the home, making our dwellings extensions of our St. Demetrios Church.

 

3.) Ministering to the sick: visiting Shut-ins, visitations to hospitals, nursing homes, etc.

    ·      Although ministering to those in need is a primary task of the clergy, it is incumbent on each of us to pray for one another and to extend Christian love to those who are unable to participate actively in the life of our Church as we are all members of one body, that Body being Christ.
    ·      Prayer list

 

4.) Attending to the Youth: providing programs that develop knowledge of the Faith (Holy Scripture and Holy Tradition).

    ·      The primary task of educating youth belongs to the family, that is, the parents of our children, their godparents, extended families and parish family.
    ·      As such, we must labor to create more of a parish family ministry to support our parents in their divine task.  We should also place emphasis at the Church on studying Scripture and sharing our Holy Tradition with our youth in formal settings.

 

5.) Establish a healthy community of Brothers and Sisters, working hand in hand, serving each other, imitating Christ’s selflessness displayed during His Passion and practicing His command to Love and Forgive.  "Establish a loving, hospitable, community that gives sacrificially and offers the first fruits of their stewardship to God and to One Another."  The Biblical model of stewardship is not simply giving a financial gift to the Church but sharing one's self through a thoughtful offering of time, talent, and treasury to God and one another.  In so doing we not only function selflessly, in harmony, and with hospitality, we share in the love of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

 

6.) To maintain a focus for growth and development for our future expansion.  As any family responsibly plans for growth, we should do likewise. The Church and her auxiliary buildings belong to God, serve our needs and allow us to experience "God with us."  As we mature in faith, we will continue realize our physical needs of a new Sanctuary, fellowship hall, offices, classroom, etc to further our ministry and to share God's love with others.  Such expansion projects will be actualized through each of us sacrificially giving to the glory of God in the unique manner to which we are able, based upon His gifts to us.

 

7.) To present a good Christian example of Servant Leadership.  Each of us, priest and layperson, shares in an aspect of the Royal Priesthood of Christ. Our task is to realize this stewardship as His servants, in a manner befitting His example to His disciples, His people and His Creation.  With a humbled spirit, each of us should take up our Cross and assist those to stumble, like Simon of Syrene.

Message from Fr Gary

Fr Gary

Encounter Christ


Many Evangelical Christians can name the date in which they were “Born Again.” The day in which they made Christ a priority in their life. Many of us, as Orthodox Christians, make that commitment on the day of our Baptism and Christmation, as infants. Are we transformed by the love of Christ? Do we allow ourselves to be transformed by Christ? There is a common theme in the Sunday Gospel readings following Pascha (Easter). Each of these five Sunday Gospels after Pascha distinguish a person (or persons) transformed by Christ.

The Sunday following Pascha we hear of “Doubting” Thomas. Thomas is skeptical about the encounter his brother disciples have with the risen Lord and make a bold proclamation, “Unless I see and touch!” The Lord reveals himself to Thomas and Thomas is immediately transformed. Without having to touch, he exclaims, “My Lord and my God!” Thomas encounter’s Christ and his faith is renewed.

The second Sunday after Pascha, we learn of the Myrrh-Bearing Women. These brave women approach the tomb of Christ and find it empty. Having encountered Christ, they return and share the good news with the disciples. Then on the third Sunday after our Lord’s Resurrection the Church shares the story of the paralytic. Although this happens before the Lord’s crucifixion, it holds fast to the theme of “Encountering Christ.” The man has suffered with an infirmity for 38 years...

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